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Forces and Motion

Intelino / Voyager Lab: "Floor-it" Acceleration/Max Speed

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Submitted by Rich on Thu, 09/05/2019 - 20:18

Introduction

The purpose of this lesson is to challenge your students to design an experiment for which data from PocketLab Voyager is used to determine the "floor-it" acceleration and maximum speed of the intelino smart train engine.  Required data should be obtained in a single run of data collection by the PocketLab app.  Figure 1 shows a picture of Voyager attached to the top of an intelino smart engine.  Designed for all ages, intelino is intuitive with its app, has built-in sensors to provide an interactive experience for the user, and is easily programmed with colo

intelino/Voyager: Periodic Motion Lab

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Submitted by Rich on Thu, 08/29/2019 - 00:30

Introduction

Periodic motion is motion that repeats itself in regular intervals.  If the motion has characteristics that are sinusoidal, then the motion is said to be simple harmonic (SHM).  In this lesson, periodic motion that is not simple harmonic is studied.  Never-the-less, the motion shows many characteristics of SHM, as can be seen when studying the position, velocity, and acceleration graphs.  This lab makes use of PocketLab Voyager that has hitched a ride on an "intelino® smart train" and is running on the VelocityLab app.  Int

intelino/Voyager: 7-9 Math/Physical Science Slope Lab

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Submitted by Rich on Mon, 08/26/2019 - 16:30

Introduction

Math students are typically introduced to the concept of slope in the 7th grade, learning that slope has to do with steepness.  By the 8th grade many learn how to calculate the slope of a line as the rise divided by the run or rise over run.  If the rise is positive, then the slope is positive (sloping upward).  On the other hand, if the rise is negative, then the slope is negative (sloping downward). If the line is horizontal, then the slope is zero.

Grade Level

intelino / Voyager Lab: Stopping Distance vs. Speed

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Submitted by Rich on Tue, 08/20/2019 - 00:42

Introduction

Have you ever been told not to follow too close to the driver ahead of you?  To keep a safe distance?  To abide by the "3-second rule"?  To keep a distance of at least one car length for every ten miles per hour of speed?  These questions all deal with the issue of stopping distance versus speed in order to avoid crashes.  A great way to investigate the relationship between stopping distance and speed is to interface Voyager with an "intelino® smart train".   Designed for all ages, intelino is intuitive with its app, has bui

intelino / PocketLab: Velocity vs. Impulse to Stop

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Submitted by Rich on Sat, 08/17/2019 - 15:34

Introduction

While driving at 40 mph, you see a red stop light ahead.  You press your brakes for several seconds, gradually coming to a stop.  A little later on the same road at 40 mph, you approach another light, this time green.  While approaching this light, it suddenly changes to yellow.  You make a split-second decision to put on your brakes to avoid going through a red light.  With the brakes applied quite hard, you quickly stop, waking up your sleeping friend in the front passenger seat.

Subject
Grade Level

intelino/PocketLab: Impulse & Change in Momentum

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Submitted by Rich on Sun, 08/11/2019 - 20:59

Introduction

This lesson features Voyager and the "intelino® smart train" in a lab for AP physics students.  Designed for all ages, intelino is intuitive with its app, has built-in sensors to provide an interactive experience for the user, and is easily programmed with color snaps that allow the user to control intelino's actions.  Students are challenged to design and carry out an experiment to show that impulse is equal to change in momentum when Voyager is mounted to an intelino smart engine that suddenly reverses itself.

Subject
Grade Level

intelino/PocketLab: Relative Velocity Lab Grades 6-9

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Submitted by Rich on Wed, 07/31/2019 - 15:47

Introduction

Here is a physical science lab for junior high students that brings out the S, T, E, and M in STEM -- S for the science of relative velocity, T for the technology of sensors, E for engineering an experiment design, and M for the mathematics used in analyzing data.  How can all of this be accomplished?  Simply interface  PocketLab Voyager

Grade Level

intelino smart train/PocketLab: Match-made-in-heaven

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Submitted by Rich on Mon, 07/22/2019 - 15:35

Introduction

Are you looking for some great physical science activities for 4th grade through junior high school students?  If so, it would be well worth considering interfacing PocketLab Voyager with the  "intelino® smart train".  Designed for all ages, intelino is intuitive with its app, has built-in sensors to provide an interactive experience for the user, and is easily programmed with color snaps that allow the user to control intelino's actions.  In this lesson, your students are challenged to design an experiment to measure intel

intelino smart train/Voyager: Angular Velocity

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Submitted by Rich on Tue, 07/16/2019 - 20:53

Introduction

In a previous lesson the "intelino® smart train" was introduced, and an activity on speed for 4th grade through middle school students was presented.  In that lesson Voyager was "on board" the intelino train and collected data for measuring the speed of the train.  With students at the 4th grade level learning angle measurements in degrees and also having a solid foundation in multiplication and long division, there is

PocketLab Voyager Rides the “intelino® smart train”

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Submitted by Rich on Fri, 07/12/2019 - 17:32

Introduction

There is a new train out there - the “intelino® smart train, the classic toy train reinvented", according to the developer.  Designed for all ages, it is intuitive with its app, has built-in sensors to provide an interactive experience for the user, and is easily programmed with color snaps that allow the user to control intelino's actions.  Attach a PocketLab Voyager to the top of the intelino smart engine as shown in Figure 1, and you have a great way for children from 4th grade through middle school to s