Skip to main content

Scratch

A Wireless Controller for a Scratch Game

Profile picture for user DaveBakker
Submitted by DaveBakker on Tue, 04/10/2018 - 02:36

Let's create a game in Scratch that is controlled by a wireless controller using the PocketLab accelerometer. PocketLab can connect directly and wirelessly to Scratch, and can send sensor data in real time. This game uses the PocketLab accelerometer to move sprites around the screen.

This program is for intermediate or advanced Scratch users, and if you would like a simpler starting point to get started with connecting Scratch to the outside world through PocketLab, you can start here:

Subject

Programming with Sensors in Scratch

Profile picture for user DaveBakker
Submitted by DaveBakker on Sun, 04/08/2018 - 05:18

This lesson will show you programming in Scratch with external sensors. We can read sensor data directly into Scratch and use it to write programs that make decisions based on what the sensors are measuring. If you need a quick primer on Scratch programming, go to this link. There are plenty of resources to get you started.

Subject

Scratch and PocketLab Space Blaster game

Profile picture for user DaveBakker
Submitted by DaveBakker on Tue, 03/06/2018 - 00:03

Download the Scratch .sbx file for a Space Blaster game you can play with Scratch and PocketLab. Works with PocketLab One and Voyager. 

Instructions to run ScratchX and the PocketLab web app are here.

The Space Blaster game is also featured in our PocketLab and Scratch STEM Coding Challenge - see attached pdf file for complete programming guide.

Subject

A Lesson in Radioactivity and Half-Life: Voyager/Scratch Geiger Counter Simulation

Profile picture for user Rich
Submitted by Rich on Tue, 02/20/2018 - 21:10

This lesson makes it possible for your students to study radioactive decay and half-life concepts without the need to purchase expensive radiation monitors and actual radioactive isotopes.  Scratch and Voyager work together to accomplish this via a simulation that matches that of true radioactive decay.  ScratchX is not required, but may be used.  The Scratch program provides the decay process.  With each decay of a simulated atom, the Scratch screen quickly flashes white and emits a beep sound similar to that of a typical Geiger counter.  Voyager’s light sensor records each of the decays a

A Lesson in Probability and Statistics: Voyager/Scratch Coin Tossing Simulation

Profile picture for user Rich
Submitted by Rich on Wed, 02/14/2018 - 19:25

This lesson introduces students to a variety of probability and statistics concepts using PocketLab Voyager and Scratch—ScratchX is not required.  The Scratch program simulates tossing any number of coins any number of times, displaying the number of heads in each toss with a square having varying shades of grey—black for zero heads and white for the maximum possible number of heads in each toss.  The simulated coins are tossed once each second with Voyager’s light sensor recording the results for each toss.

Subject

Using Scratch with PocketLab

Profile picture for user PocketLab
Submitted by PocketLab on Tue, 12/05/2017 - 18:18

PocketLab let's you write Scratch programs that talk to the outside world. This guide will help you get started connecting your PocketLab to MIT Media Lab's Scratch software. With PocketLab and Scratch you can read real time sensor data in Scratch and write programs that interact with the outside world.

Follow these steps to get started with the PocketLab - Scratch integration: 

Tags