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Science for Everyone

Science for Everyone PocketLab Experiment

The PocketLab Community includes thousands of educators and students worldwide exploring science and engineering together.

Find lessons, activities, and programming applications suitable for everyone from 4th grade Earth Science students to college-level engineering students.

Featured Activities

Amusement parks provide an authentic opportunity to conduct real science and apply physics and math concepts in real-world situations.  While visiting an…
What does an accelerometer measure? The obvious answer is acceleration, but that's not really true. An accelerometer actually measures normal force or…
In the study of collisions between two carts, it is desirable to collect position data for both carts.  This can be done with a pair of Voyagers, each…

Middle School Science

A common experiment for studying the reflectivity of different colored surfaces makes use of colored construction paper, aluminum foil, a light source, and a…
Ozobot “Evo” (ozobot.com) is a tiny one-inch diameter robot that can be quickly programmed using a Google Blockly dialect known as OzoBlockly (ozoblockly.com…
There are over a dozen activities that you can do with your PocketLab Maker Kit! Below you will find instructions and links each activity, and you can find…

High School Physics

This lesson is motivated by an article by Paul G. Hewitt entitled “Sailing into the Wind: A Vector Explanation”, appearing in the Summer 2017 edition of NSTA’s…
In addition to being a fascinating toy, the ZéCar flywheel powered car can be utilized in physics curricula to study conservation of energy.  It is available…
In addition to being a fun toy, the “Slinky” is commonly used in physics classes to qualitatively investigate a variety of wave properties: longitudinal versus…

News

People can't seem to stop fidgeting with Fidget Spinners, so they might as well learn some science along the way! This 3D printed enclosure allows you to put a…
PocketLab fits perfectly as a payload for an Estes rocket! Great way to quantify launch acceleration, free fall, and altitude. (Click here for original tweet)
PocketLab user Ryan Hollister attached his PocketLab One to a drone to measure it's altitude. The PocketLab calculates altitude using its barometric pressure…