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Physical Science

Thermos Design Challenge

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Submitted by PocketLab on Fri, 08/02/2019 - 13:33

In these two design challenges, students will design and construct their own thermos/storage device using craft materials and measure its effectiveness to insulate a liquid with a PocketLab temperature probe. These activities are aligned with two middle school NGSS standards and are a great open-ended, hands-on project for students to engage their critical thinking and engineering skills. 

intelino/PocketLab: Relative Velocity Lab Grades 6-9

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Submitted by Rich on Wed, 07/31/2019 - 15:47

Introduction

Here is a physical science lab for junior high students that brings out the S, T, E, and M in STEM -- S for the science of relative velocity, T for the technology of sensors, E for engineering an experiment design, and M for the mathematics used in analyzing data.  How can all of this be accomplished?  Simply interface  PocketLab Voyager

Grade Level

intelino smart train/PocketLab: Match-made-in-heaven

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Submitted by Rich on Mon, 07/22/2019 - 15:35

Introduction

Are you looking for some great physical science activities for 4th grade through junior high school students?  If so, it would be well worth considering interfacing PocketLab Voyager with the  "intelino® smart train".  Designed for all ages, intelino is intuitive with its app, has built-in sensors to provide an interactive experience for the user, and is easily programmed with color snaps that allow the user to control intelino's actions.  In this lesson, your students are challenged to design an experiment to measure intel

intelino smart train/Voyager: Angular Velocity

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Submitted by Rich on Tue, 07/16/2019 - 20:53

Introduction

In a previous lesson the "intelino® smart train" was introduced, and an activity on speed for 4th grade through middle school students was presented.  In that lesson Voyager was "on board" the intelino train and collected data for measuring the speed of the train.  With students at the 4th grade level learning angle measurements in degrees and also having a solid foundation in multiplication and long division, there is

PocketLab Voyager Rides the “intelino® smart train”

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Submitted by Rich on Fri, 07/12/2019 - 17:32

Introduction

There is a new train out there - the “intelino® smart train, the classic toy train reinvented", according to the developer.  Designed for all ages, it is intuitive with its app, has built-in sensors to provide an interactive experience for the user, and is easily programmed with color snaps that allow the user to control intelino's actions.  Attach a PocketLab Voyager to the top of the intelino smart engine as shown in Figure 1, and you have a great way for children from 4th grade through middle school to s

Sensors for Forest Fires

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Submitted by Danny on Wed, 06/05/2019 - 19:41

Forest fires are a common natural disaster within western North America and pose a serious risk to many communities both nearby due to direct danger of the fire, as well as far away in the form of air pollution. Currently, in many places, some form of government employee will be in charge of looking out for forest fires and once identified, satellites and computer programs can be used to track its progression and predict where the fire will spread and where the smoke cloud will go. This allows us to evacuate individuals who may be in danger and minimize loss of life.

Momentum Pendulum Rides the PocketLab HotRod

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Submitted by Rich on Sun, 05/26/2019 - 23:36

The Momentum Pendulum

The momentum pendulum is shown in Figure 1.  A frame (red) to hold the pendulum was printed on a 3D printer.  The STL file in included with this lesson.  The frame is solidly attached to the PocketLab HotRod with three damage-free hanging strips.  A roughly 3" diameter  wood ball with a screw eye attached to the top of the ball is hung from a bifilar suspension so that the ball will swing in a plane.  Two small holes at the top of the frame provide an easy way to prepare the string suspension.  The smaller set of wheels are used with the HotRod, and

Competing Pendulums

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Submitted by Rich on Sat, 05/18/2019 - 19:30

Competing Pendulums

The two pendulums shown in Figure 1 were printed on a 3D printer.  The .STL file is included with this lesson so you can print them with your 3D printer.  They have the same length, same mass, and same thickness.  They swing about a piece of metal rod from a coat hanger.  To provide a rigid support, the rod has been attached to a ring stand.  A tiny magnet has been taped to the bottom of each pendulum.  PocketLab Voyager's magnetic field sensor keeps track of the motion as the pendulums swing back-and-forth.  What is your prediction as to which one has

Grade Level

Simple Harmonic Motion Demonstration Machine

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Submitted by Rich on Thu, 05/09/2019 - 14:52

Introduction

In a well-known 1938 book entitled "Demonstration Experiments in Physics", editor Richard Sutton describes a device that produces simple harmonic motion (SHM) mechanically.  With today's tremendous growth in the 3D printing industry, such a device can now be easily constructed for classroom demonstrations of SHM.  Couple this device with PocketLab Voyager and you can obtain real-time graphs describing the motion.

Grade Level

Newton’s Third Law

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Submitted by DaveBakker on Tue, 04/23/2019 - 18:14

Engineering Crash Cushions to Learn Newton's Third Law

Newton's third law states that for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. By crashing a physics cart into a wall, various crash cushions can be used to reduce the forces experience by the cart.