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Engineering

Crash Cushioning Lab - NGSS Based

Submitted by Rich on Thu, 12/06/2018 - 16:09

Introduction to Crash Cushioning

In addition to automobile features that promote road safety, there has been and continues to be a great deal of work on highway features that save lives.  An earlier lab entitled Crash Cushion Investigation, submitted by PocketLab, makes use of the PocketLab HotRod to investigate crash cushioning similar to that shown in Figure 1.    

Grade Level

Tactile Sensor as an ON/OFF ScratchX Switch

Submitted by Rich on Sun, 08/26/2018 - 01:04

A Tactile Sensor ON/OFF ScratchX Switch

This lesson provides an example of how to ScratchX program PocketLab Voyager's tactile sensor as an ON/OFF switch.  If you have a device such as a light bulb, motor, or robot that is under control of ScratchX, then the code in this lesson may be a starting point for you.  The ScratchX program assumes that the device can be in any one of two possible states, which we will call ON and OFF.

How does an Accelerometer Work - Physics of Probeware

Submitted by clifton on Mon, 04/16/2018 - 21:39

What does an accelerometer measure? The obvious answer is acceleration, but that's not really true. An accelerometer actually measures normal force or restoring force which we equate to acceleration using the formula, F=ma. This article will explain the fundamental operating principles of accelerometers and investigate the capabilities and drawbacks of accelerometers in certain applications.

Grade Level

Internet of Things at Stanford University

Submitted by DaveBakker on Mon, 04/09/2018 - 17:47

What Internet of Things projects are Stanford students developing? Stanford ME220 "Introduction to Sensors" is an introduction to the variety of sensors that are used in engineering practice. Students in this class get a comprehensive overview of common practices with sensors and learn the direction in which sensor technologies are heading. 

Grade Level

Hot Wheels Racing with PocketLab

Submitted by PocketLab on Wed, 01/31/2018 - 18:45

Engage your students in engineering practices and classic force and motion and energy concepts in a fun and unique way. With a PocketLab attached to a Hot Wheels car and a track full of magnets, you'll be able to collect data on position, velocity, acceleration, and energy as your car zips up an over hills and around loops. Turn your students into theme park engineers and have them design "roller coaster" tracks, iterate on car designs for races, or teach basic concepts on position and velocity. This activity is sure to help engage your students in a meaningful way. 

VelocityLab/Voyager: Using VelocityLab with LEGO® Carts

Submitted by Rich on Sat, 10/21/2017 - 02:43

Carts constructed with the LEGO® Simple & Powered Machines Set are great for studying motion kinematics, as the resultant motion is fairly smooth, resulting in less noisy data.  While you can use the range finder and PocketLab app, it has been found by the author that using Voyager and the VelocityLab app is less noisy as well.  The problem that one immediately confronts when considering this approach, however, is that both the small wheels and the large wheels in the LEGO® set are too small for attaching Voyager.

Grade Level

Flame in Freefall

Submitted by SteveMaier_ on Fri, 10/06/2017 - 21:40

A novel activity that demonstrates one of the effects of a microgravity environment. In this exercise, the structure of a flame is filmed while simultaneously plotting the acceleration of the system as it is released and experiences freefall. The apparatus is low-cost, possibly using only scrap materials found in the classroom. A PocketLab One is paired with a smartphone and used to collect the data.  Conceptually, the exercise is straightforward, though considering noise in the data, limits of the system, and chemistry applications could easily enrich the content.

Grade Level

Fluid Energy (Bernoulli Principle) Lab

Submitted by kwarnke on Fri, 10/06/2017 - 19:47

PocketLab sensors can measure the pressure in a fluid line easily, by putting the PocketLab into a plastic wash bottle.  (For protection, put the sensor in a ziplock bag with a paper towel.)  The wash bottle nozzle inserts easily into 1/4" ID tubing, and can be used as a pressure tap to measure fluid pressure in two different T junctions.

Grade Level

PocketLab Voyager: Investigating Thermoelectric Generators & The Seebeck Effect

Submitted by Rich on Thu, 09/21/2017 - 20:07

A thermoelectric generator (TEG) is a device that converts temperature differences directly into electrical energy.  In the past several years, there has been a great deal of research in the use of TEGs to recover electrical energy from waste heat produced in a variety of systems.  As a result of this research, the study of thermoelectric generators in physics and engineering curricula is well worth including in NGSS-based coursework.

Grade Level